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NEW ZEALAND V AUSTRALIA TESTS

Voges survives 'horrific' no-ball ruling

12 February 2016

Voges given a reprieve after being bowled off a no-ball, but replays reveal Bracewell's foot was behind the line

A "horrific" umpiring decision has again put the role of officials in the spotlight following a no-ball drama in the final over of the first Test between Australia and New Zealand in Wellington.

Australia batsman Adam Voges was bowled having shouldered arms to the fourth ball of Doug Bracewell's 11th over. The delivery seamed in and hit Voges' off stump, but the batsman, still in his leaving pose saw umpire Richard Illingworth raise his right arm to signal for a no ball.

However, controversy erupted when replays clearly showed Bracewell did have part of his front foot behind the popping crease.

Dismissed batsmen have previously been granted reprieves by the third umpire after checks of the front foot found the bowler to have overstepped, but there was no provision for the third umpire to overrule the on-field umpire's signal.

Quick single: Australia in control after dominant day

Voges did not add to his score of 7 in the final over as Australia finished on 3-147, still trailing New Zealand's first innings by 36 runs.

Former Test opener Chris Rogers labelled the decision "horrific" and called for cricket to better use technology.

WATCH: Rogers fires up on Across the Ditch

"Horrific, that's how I'd describe it," Rogers told Optus Sport's Across the Ditch

"I don't understand it, why can we not get these decisions right? There's enough time for the third umpire to change the decision.

"New Zealand have done nothing wrong there, they shouldn't be penalised.

"We keep seeing these incidents happen, why can we not embrace technology and get it right every time?"

The umpires were heavily involved in play throughout the first day of the first Test in Wellington. Both skippers successfully reviewed for the first wicket in each innings.

Black Caps opener Tom Latham was caught behind off a feathered edge to give Josh Hazlewood the first of his four wickets.

And in Australia's innings, opener Joe Burns was initially given not out but was found to have got a glove on a ball down the leg side in the tourists' first over.

WATCH: Australia dominate day one

Today's incident follows the controversy surrounding the Mitchell Marsh dismissal in the final one-day Chappell-Hadlee series match. 

Marsh was given out after a replay shown on the big screen prompted mass uproar from the crowd, leading to the on-field umpires to send the replay upstairs.

There was no issue with the decision, however there was much debate about the process followed, and that will certainly be the issue again with this latest  incident.

Hazlewood made light of the Marsh catch issue after play today, joking the Australians "were just hoping that it didn't come up on the big screen too quickly".

"Obviously the umpire's made the decision and we just go with that, that's what they're there for to make those tough decisions and that's how it went," Hazlewood told reporters after play."

WATCH: Players address Voges no-ball incident

Hazlewood also offered his cautious backing to the suggestion third umpires should be more involved in the policing of the front foot.

"That makes it very clear for every delivery," the fast bowler said. 

"But it's still up to you to get your foot behind the line on more occasions but it's one thing I guess we might have to look at."

New Zealand spinner Mark Craig was non-plussed by the affair but said the Black Caps were naturally disappointed.

"That's cricket, once his arm's thrown out there's not much you can do about it," Craig told reporters. "It's the way it goes, I suppose.

"We didn't see it (the replay) until we came off. Once his arm goes out there's not much you can do about it.

"There's obviously going to be a bit of disappointment but we can't do much about it now and we'll look forward to tomorrow."

About the Writer

 @Dave_Middleton
@Dave_Middleton

Dave Middleton is cricket.com.au's senior news editor. From Queensland, he spent 10 years in the UK where he wrote for The Times, The Sunday Times, the Guardian and The Telegraph.

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