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WEST INDIES V INDIA T20

Lewis joins exclusive club with T20I ton

10 July 2017

Sam Ferris


@samuelfez

Sam Ferris


@samuelfez

Gayle and McCullum have been joined by another master blaster

West Indies opener Evin Lewis put India to the sword on Sunday with a record-breaking century to deliver the hosts a comprehensive nine-wicket win in the lone T20 international at Sabina Park.

Lewis’ 125no is the highest second-innings score in the brief history of T20I cricket, a knock that soaked up most of the 191-run victory target set by India.

Lewis KO's India in sole T20I

The swashbuckling right-hander surpassed the previous benchmark of 122 by Hong Kong’s Babar Hayat, who took down Oman in February last year.

Lewis’ 62 ball blitzkrieg featured 12 sixes – the second most by an individual in a run chase, behind Proteas powerhouse Richard Levi’s baker’s dozen against New Zealand in 2012.

The performance granted the 25-year-old membership to an exclusive club of batsmen with multiple centuries in T20I cricket, joining Windies teammate Chris Gayle and New Zealand tyro Brendon McCullum.

His first T20I hundred, exactly 100, came against India last year at Lauderhill in the USA. 

While Lewis managed only 67 runs in four innings in the preceding one-day international series against Virat Kohli’s charges, his talents were on full display in Jamaica.

"It was at the back of my mind that I didn't get a score in the one-dayers but I just believe in backing myself and playing my style of game," said Lewis after play.

"This is a very good bowling team so any runs you get against them is really appreciated."

Highest scores in T20I cricket


156 – Aaron Finch, v England, Southampton, 2013

145no – Glenn Maxwell v Sri Lanka, Pallekele, 2016

125no – Evin Lewis v India, Kingston, 2017

Highest second innings scores in T20I cricket


125no – Evin Lewis v India, Kingston, 2017

122 – Babar Hayat v Oman, Fatullah, 2016

117no – Richard Levi v New Zealand, Hamilton, 2012

About the Writer

@samuelfez

Sam Ferris is a Sydney-based journalist for cricket.com.au. He started in 2011 as a Big Bash League correspondent and continues to monitor the domestic scene and national sides closely.