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Future belongs to day-night Tests: Misbah

The Pakistan veteran stresses players need to adjust to playing with the pink ball

Ahead of the second ever day-night Test match, Pakistan captain Misbah-ul-Haq has insisted players need to embrace the pink ball and suggested the issues surrounding its use will subside as more games are played.

Misbah’s men begin their defence of their recently-achieved No.1 Test ranking when they kick-off their three-Test series in the UAE against the West Indies with a day-night game in Dubai next month.

And the 42-year-old believes pink-ball Tests are here to stay and says, in time, they’ll be as commonplace as the use of white balls for one-day games.

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"(The) future belongs to night Tests and this should be played frequently," Misbah said.

“If the future is with day-night Tests, then we have to play it more often and we have to start embracing it quickly. Like we play one-day cricket with a white ball, and this pattern had been adapted everywhere in domestic and even in club cricket.

"Meanwhile, there are problems, whether it's a pink or orange ball, for batsmen and fielders so far. These issues can only sorted by playing more cricket under lights with pink balls.

“Since the game is played for the fans and for the audience, this night cricket is the future and it's definitely good for cricket. The more frequently we play under lights, it will give more exposure and allow players to get used to it."

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The visibility and durability of the pink-ball – for players and spectators alike – were key concerns ahead of the inaugural day-night Test between Australia and New Zealand at the Adelaide Oval last year.

While efforts are still being made to improve the ball, the match attracted huge spectator interest and crowd numbers, paving the way for Australia to host two more Tests under lights, against Pakistan and South Africa, this summer.

Ahead of their first official outing with the pink ball against the West Indies, Misbah admits his side have a few adjustments to make.

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"We will have six to seven days before the first Test, so we have to train maximum under lights with pink ball, and try to understand the conditions,” the right-hander said.

“We have to adjust to the timing of the sessions, understand how the ball will travel under lights, how much the ball will swing under lights, and how much the dew factor will be affecting it.

“If you see, the major chunk of the Test is in night, so it basically isn't really a day-night Test. So we have to start working from scratch."

The West Indies have named a 15-man squad for the three-Test series against Pakistan, with left-arm spinner Jomel Warrican the only inclusion from their squad that lost their four-Test series 2-0 to India in the Caribbean.

Following the pink ball fixture in Dubai, the two sides meet in regular red ball Tests in Abu Dhabi and Sharjah.

West Indies Test squad for Pakistan series: Jason Holder (captain), Kraigg Brathwaite (vice captain), Devendra Bishoo, Jermaine Blackwood, Carlos Brathwaite, Darren Bravo, Roston Chase, Miguel Cummins, Shane Dowrich, Shannon Gabriel, Shai Hope, Leon Johnson, Alzarri Joseph, Marlon Samuels, Jomel Warrican.

Meg Lanning Steve Smith